WhenHub - Captain of your Camera

Captain of your Camera

A course for you, the beginning photographer. You will learn the 10 photo concepts that professional photographers know. Upon completing the course, I certify that you will be an apprentice photographer. You won't be a master, but you'll have superpowers compared to everybody else.

Learn Photography by discovering Sprezzatura in Cinema

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Sprezzatura is a certain nonchalance, so as to conceal all art and make whatever one does or says appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it.


It can also be considered a studied carelessness, especially in art, literature, cinema or photography.


Sprezzatura is an effortless mastery of ones own style, a studied carelessness that veils the work needed to create it. It is the very essence of compelling, stylish cinema and can be watched time after time. Sprezzatura Cinema will never grow old, its spirit will never be dimmed, it will forever be inspiration to those who can see beauty.


Keep in mind this concept from cinema when you take photos and your photos will take on a new looks of ease and quality.

Learn Photography by watching professionals: How the Sartorialist makes street style click

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This video delves into greater detail about Scott Schuman's photography of fashion and style on the street.


You can learn a lot by watching this video and listening to Scott Schuman talk about his work.

Learn Photography by watching professionals: Intro to the Sartorialist

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Scott Schuman, better known as the Sartorialist, captures examples of street style around the world to post on his popular blog. He’s not documenting not fashion trends exactly, but something more individual and personal.


As a professional photographer, if you are involved in photographing people to any extent (as is the case for many photographers) then you will need to develop the skills to photograph people. The main concepts are that you must learn the PIC system. This acronym stands for:


(1) Prepare (2) Imagine (3) Choose.


You have to be prepared to get the shot, imagine what you're trying to capture, and learn to choose the best shot from all the images you've taken.


When you watch this video you will absorb these techniques merely by observing the photographer at work. You don't have to mentally try to learn technical details, you will instantly get a feel by watching of behaviors and actions that master photographers use when shooting photographs.


To check out Scott Schuman's photography blog: http://www.thesartorialist.com/

Learn Photography by watching professionals: Garry Winogrand

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Garry Winogrand was one of the original street photographers - photographers who took pictures spontaneously on the streets of people who did not know, and were not prepared to be photographed.


In early photography portraits of people were done in controlled environments, and the move to the streets, which was made possible by small, lightweight cameras that were easy to operate quickly paved the road for photographers to take pictures incognito.


Whereas the photography of the Sartorialist, Scott Schuman, is based on quickly developing rapport with strangers on the street, Winogrand's approach was more like that of a sniper or paparazzi. He would shoot photos quickly and without asking permission; his goal was to capture a candid, unposed moment without the subject altering their expression or posture.


This video is particularly interesting as a psychological portrait of Winogrand himself. He did not think of himself as an artist. He took pictures because he wanted to see what the photos would look like, as he realized the that two dimensional image was nothing like real life.


For Winogrand, taking pictures was a like a drug, and he needed to take photos every day. Photography, for him, was not a choice but something he had to do every day to survive.

Learn Photography by watching professionals: Photographer Joel Meyerowitz

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Learn Photography by watching professionals: Elliott Erwitt

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Elliott Erwitt was the Master of the iconic "moment."


In this video he presents his life work and wry wit.


Great photographers are often memorable people, and their photos convey their unique view of life.


Erwitt saw the amusing moments of life and portrayed them in his photographs. I think you'll enjoy these images and you may even draw some inspiration and see the world around you differently after watching this video.

You are ready for the next step

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You’ve done it. You’ve reached the number of selfies one person can take before their soul implodes. On vacation, you’ve snapped the same landscape photo that all the tourists around you have taken and trust me, they look identical. And the photo editing app on your iPhone still seems to limit you somehow. No matter how much you zoom in or out, or add effects on Instagram, you know that the photo you took does not actually show the world what you see. That sunset that you just snapped a picture of has muted colors in comparison to what your eyes behold. And the lighting is all wrong. Also… is that a bit of your thumb on the side?

Suddenly, you are seized with overwhelming jealousy for the guy who is a little ways down the beach, squatting over a starfish with his DSLR camera and giant lens. I could do that… you think to yourself. As if hearing your thoughts, the man turns to look in your direction and instinctively you hide your smartphone in shame. I’m a real photographer seems to be plastered on his forehead to mock you.

But the truth is, he isn’t. That guy, who just got the most incredible photo of a starfish by the way, just read my book. In fact, a few months ago, he was a sorry sap on the same beach hiding his Samsung Galaxy 18 from another “real photographer”.

The truth is, that you don’t have to take a class to learn photography. You can try to learn through trial and error, which will probably take you years. You can try reading the owner’s manual of the DSLR camera that you just bought. (A camera that is all wrong for you by the way. Check chapter 1). Or you can buy my book. It’s a $10 commitment that will easily transform you from the Instagram aficionado to a real live, full-fledged, amateur photographer. Will you turn into Ansel Adams after reading this book? No, probably not. He is a genius. But you will come out the other side taking photos that will be impressive and near professional quality.

If you are still not sold on the idea, let me ask you a few questions. If you can answer them confidently then I will let you off the hook. OK, here we go:

1.    What type of camera should you buy and why?

Is that hesitation I sense coming from your direction?

2. What is the best way to blur the background?

Still nothing? Ok, one more

3.    How do you tell the difference between specular and diffused light?

Yep, that’s what I thought. Buy the book. It’s clear, simple and quite possibly the cheapest meaningful step you can take to become a better photographer.



Learn 80% of what a photographer knows in 1 hour.

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When people find out I’m a photographer they quickly tell me that they love photography too, but they only take pictures with their smartphones these days. Then they tell me that they own a DSLR but leave it at home because they haven’t read the manual, and don’t understand the controls. “One day I’m going to take a photo class to learn how to use that camera.”


Yet these same people, when I see them a year later, have never taken the class. What I notice is that people imagine that it takes a long time to learn to use a DSLR to take great photos. First they have to read the manual, then maybe take that class. Then there is all the time to practice. It could take ten years before you finally learn to take amazing photos. But what if you could accelerate your learning process? What if you could learn everything in one hour?


Professional photographers work on instinct. It appears we have super powers, but it's not true. It appears so because the secrets to the super powers are seldom revealed because photographers talk with other photographers, and don't always venture in to the world at large to teach. Those who do are not always good at explaining how they are so strong, capable or confident. They just do their work amazingly well.


I’m skilled at explaining things in a simple way, and that’s why I wrote this book. If you don't possess super powers, then why not learn from someone who does and will share them with you?


You probably don’t have the time to read a long book about photography, especially when you just want to know enough to shoot great photos on your next vacation. I have distilled everything I know into 12 short lessons that will help you learn 80% of what a photographer knows in 1 hour. Each lesson is simple and can be read in about 5 minutes. You can learn all 12 concepts in 60 minutes.


How this curriculum is organized:


Each of the 12 lessons teaches one essential photo concept that you can read and apply quickly. At the end of each chapter you will see an arrow with the words each section stick, “DO THIS NOW” followed by an actionable item to help you practice what you’ve learned.

Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 2

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 3

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 4

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 5

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 6

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 7

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 8

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 9

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 10

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 11

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 12

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Captain of Your Camera - Lesson 1

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Superpowers compared to everybody else

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This photography course curriculum is designed to accelerate your learning to become a skilled photographer.


After you complete these 12 short lessons you will achieve the skills and knowledge to take professional quality photos.


At the end of this course I will certify you to be an apprentice photographer. You certainly won't be a master photographer, but you'll have superpowers compared to everybody else.


I'm a professional photographer and I'm good at explaining things in a simple way. If you don’t have super powers, then why not learn from someone who does and is willing to share them with you?


You probably don’t have the time to read a long book about photography, especially when you just want to know enough to shoot great photos on your next vacation. I can teach you the important photo concepts in 60 minutes.


I have a theory that you can master 80% of professional photography by knowing the 12 photo factors. This number is somewhat randomly chosen based on my experience, but these are the concepts that professionals use regularly and you won’t find them in a camera manual or most photo courses. After you read this short book I do believe your photos will look pretty close to professional quality. Your photos won’t be as good as a professional’s — that’s why I say your photos will be 80% as good. You can learn the most important photo factors in one hour when you use this book as your guide.


This curriculum is for you, the aspiring photographer, on your quest to become “Captain of your Camera.” I remember what it feels like to be where you are right now, and I want to help you learn quickly, so I’ve written the book I wish I had when I began. It will help you take great photos. If you get stuck and need advice, please drop me a line at jeff@captainofyourcamera.com